A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Discovery method

A teaching method based on permitting a student to acquire knowledge by discovering it directly, usually through experimentation. Most commonly used in laboratory science experiments, the discovery method can be applied to all levels of education and in almost all subjects if the teacher points the student in the proper direction and provides enough materials in correct sequence to permit the inevitable discovery.

Scopes Monkey Trial

The colloquial, newspaper- headline title of the near-legendary court case of 1925, when a high school science teacher, John Thomas Scopes, was charged with violating Tennessee’s law banning the teaching of Darwin’s theory of evolution.

Henry Peacham (1576–1643)

English author and teacher whose book The Compleat Gentlemen (1615) detailed a curriculum that became the standard for private schools and academies in the American colonies (and later the United States) through the early 20th century.

New Light–Old Light controversy

A bitter ecclesiastical dispute among Protestant clergymen in the 18th-century American colonies that led eventually to the creation of large numbers of new educational institutions. The controversy centered around the question of salvation.

Tutor

A teacher, usually private, who instructs students individually or in small groups.

Alston v. School Board of the City of Norfolk

The second in a 14-year series of five law suits sponsored by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)...

Hatch Experiment Station Act of 1887

A federal law appropriating funds to improve agricultural research at LAND-GRANT COLLEGES.

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

The world’s largest philanthropic organization and America’s largest privately funded FOUNDATION, with more than $60 billion in assets in 2006.

Middle school

A freestanding school housing pre-adolescents and early adolescents in the “middle” years between childhood and adolescence.

Conceptually Oriented Program for Elementary Science (COPES)

An innovative elementary school science curriculum developed at New York University in 1965 and designed to promote scientific literacy among children, without resort to reading materials.

Questioning

A pedagogical device as essential to the classroom learning process as lecturing, DIRECT INSTRUCTION and demonstration.

Feedback