A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Articulation (program)

The meshing of course materials within each school grade (horizontal) and between grades (vertical). Effective horizontal articulation interrelates all courses within a curriculum to each other. TEAM TEACHING has proved an effective method of achieving horizontal articulation, by tying studies of every subject in each grade to each other. Thus, a teaching team would tie the study of ancient Egypt in history class, for example, to the study of plane and solid geometry in mathematics class, to the study of mechanical advantage in physics (science) class, to the study of hieroglyphics in language class and to the study of one- and two-dimensional drawing in art.
Effective vertical articulation permits students to progress academically from grade to grade smoothly, with no curricular overlap or gap or radical changes in teaching methods between the end of a course in one year and the beginning of the same course the following year. To achieve effective vertical articulation, some schools assign one teacher to the same group of students for two or more consecutive years.
Ineffective articulation within an individual school is usually the result of ineffectual administration and curriculum supervision. Excessive teacher absenteeism and introduction of substitute teachers also produces poor articulation. The most difficult vertical articulation to achieve is between schools—elementary and middle, middle and high school and (the most difficult of all) high school and college.

Impacted areas program

A program that provides federal funding for construction of essential services, such as schools, in areas whose economies have been hurt by the presence of a military installation.

Cotton Mather (1663–1728)

Puritan clergyman, author, scholar and a force behind the founding of Yale University.

Calvin Ellis Stowe (1802–1886)

Congregationalist minister, educator and pioneer in the public school movement.

Student council

A group of students, usually in secondary schools, elected by the student body to serve as a form of representative selfgovernment. 

Searches of students

In education, the physical inspection by school authorities of the person and property of minor students and the equipment they use.

Perceptual disorder

A vague, “catchall” phrase referring to the difficulty or inability of an individual to absorb new information through normal sensory stimuli.

Organization

In education, the arrangement of the members of a school and school district, including students, faculty, administration and staff, and the determination of their functions, goals and interrelationships.

Authoritarian teaching

A method of teaching based entirely on teacher lectures and allowing for no classroom discussion.

Lillian D. Wald (1867–1940)

American public-health nurse and social reformer. 

Prevocational education

One or more courses designed to give middle- and highschool students an overview of “The WORLD OF WORK,” which, along with “Technology,” is the title many schools give to such courses.

Feedback