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Articulation (program)

The meshing of course materials within each school grade (horizontal) and between grades (vertical). Effective horizontal articulation interrelates all courses within a curriculum to each other. TEAM TEACHING has proved an effective method of achieving horizontal articulation, by tying studies of every subject in each grade to each other. Thus, a teaching team would tie the study of ancient Egypt in history class, for example, to the study of plane and solid geometry in mathematics class, to the study of mechanical advantage in physics (science) class, to the study of hieroglyphics in language class and to the study of one- and two-dimensional drawing in art.
Effective vertical articulation permits students to progress academically from grade to grade smoothly, with no curricular overlap or gap or radical changes in teaching methods between the end of a course in one year and the beginning of the same course the following year. To achieve effective vertical articulation, some schools assign one teacher to the same group of students for two or more consecutive years.
Ineffective articulation within an individual school is usually the result of ineffectual administration and curriculum supervision. Excessive teacher absenteeism and introduction of substitute teachers also produces poor articulation. The most difficult vertical articulation to achieve is between schools—elementary and middle, middle and high school and (the most difficult of all) high school and college.

Smith College

The largest private college for women in the United States, with more than 3,100 students in its four-year undergraduate program.

Miller Analogies Test

An examination made up of 120 verbal analogies of increasing complexity...

Year-round school

A school that operates a 12-month-a-year academic program to ensure maximum utilization of school facilities and accommodate a larger number of students without investing in plant expansion. 

Health-occupations education

The training and formal instruction required for a variety of health-related jobs that usually do not demand a professional degree.

Phonograms

Letter groupings that produce the same sound in all the words in which they appear—e.g., all, in ball, call and fall.

John Wheelock (1754–1817)

American educator who succeeded his father, the founder and first president of Dartmouth College, to the presidency of that institution in 1779.

Bible Institute

An alternative college for orthodox evangelical Christian education, founded in Chicago by revivalist preacher Dwight L. Moody in 1889.

Multiple-choice test

An examination consisting of questions that give students a choice of several possible answers with which to complete a statement or solve a problem.

Racial balance

In public education, a student population whose racial and ethnic makeup reflects the racial makeup of the general community.

Secondary School Admission Test (SSAT)

A standardized battery of tests used by more than 500 American private, independent elementary and secondary schools to measure student quantitative skills, reading comprehension skills and verbal skills.

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