A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Metropolitan Achievement Tests

One of the most widely used batteries of standardized tests to measure student achievement in grades K through 12. There are six batteries of tests: Primer, for grades k-1.4; Primary I, for 1.5–2.4; Primary II, for 2.5–3.4; Elementary, for 3.5– 4.9; Intermediate, for 5.0–6.9; Advanced, for 7.0–9.5; and High School, for grades 9–13. The Primer measures reading and writing ability and ability to listen for sounds. The Primary I subtests are “Word Knowledge,” “Word Analysis,” “Reading,” “Mathematics Computation” and “Mathematics Concepts.” As the tests become more advanced, they add such subtests as “Mathematics Problem Solving,” “Science,” “Social Science” and “Spelling.” The high school battery measures achievement in language arts, social studies, mathematics and science. Published by the Psychological Corporation/ Harcourt Brace & Co., the tests last from about an hour to as long as 4½ hours, depending on grade level. Other widely used achievement tests include the California Achievement Test, the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills and the STANFORD ACHIEVEMENT TEST.

Subject-centered curriculum

A rigid curriculum, based on specific courses, which mandates specific amounts of material to be covered over specific periods of time—regardless of student abilities or interests.

Bay City, Michigan, Project

An experiment in 1953 to improve public school education by freeing teachers from noninstructional duties and allowing them to devote more time to teaching.

Prayer in school

A phrase denoting the controversial issue in American education over the voluntary or required recitation of any sectarian or nondenominational prayer during official public school hours.

Federal Council of Churches of Christ in America

A body formed by 33 Christian Protestant denominations in 1908 to reverse the secularization of American public schools by introducing Protestant instruction into the curriculum.

Readiness skills (for school)

A body of knowledge and abilities that provide a preschool or kindergarten child with a foundation for the formal school experience and academic learning.

Halfway house

A home or other living facility that serves as a transitional residence for youngsters or adults following their release from an institution and prior to their return to a stable, permanent residence.

University of the American Expeditionary Forces in France

An institution of higher education established by General John J.

Pull-out program

Pull-out programA school plan under which students with special needs are “pulled out” of their regular classrooms for a period or two to receive special instruction in classrooms designated as RESOURCE ROOMS.

Center for Death Education and Bioethics

A section within the University of Minnesota Department of Sociology which provides educational programs on dealing with death, grief and bereavement.

Caldecott Medal

An annual award presented by the AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATION to the finest illustrated book for children, as selected by a committee of librarians.

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