A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Metropolitan Achievement Tests

One of the most widely used batteries of standardized tests to measure student achievement in grades K through 12. There are six batteries of tests: Primer, for grades k-1.4; Primary I, for 1.5–2.4; Primary II, for 2.5–3.4; Elementary, for 3.5– 4.9; Intermediate, for 5.0–6.9; Advanced, for 7.0–9.5; and High School, for grades 9–13. The Primer measures reading and writing ability and ability to listen for sounds. The Primary I subtests are “Word Knowledge,” “Word Analysis,” “Reading,” “Mathematics Computation” and “Mathematics Concepts.” As the tests become more advanced, they add such subtests as “Mathematics Problem Solving,” “Science,” “Social Science” and “Spelling.” The high school battery measures achievement in language arts, social studies, mathematics and science. Published by the Psychological Corporation/ Harcourt Brace & Co., the tests last from about an hour to as long as 4½ hours, depending on grade level. Other widely used achievement tests include the California Achievement Test, the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills and the STANFORD ACHIEVEMENT TEST.

Chaining

The sequential behavioral process that underlies PROGRAMMED INSTRUCTION.

Lawrence A. Cremin (1925–1990)

American educator, historian and president of Teachers College, Columbia University, from 1974 to 1984.

Princeton University

One of the preeminent institutions of higher education in the United States and among the most selective universities in the world, Princeton was founded as the College of New Jersey by the Presbyterian Synod of Philadelphia in 1746 after a split in the New York Presbyterian Church between orthodox Old Light and more liberal New Light factions.

Goal-free evaluation

The examination and assessment of the positive and negative “side effects,”

Viewbooks

Descriptive brochures issued by most private secondary schools and almost all colleges and graduate schools, with extensive photographs and information about their institutions.

Graduation

The formal completion of a prescribed course of study at an educational institution, as attested by the award of a certificate, diploma and/or degree.

Eye-voice span (EVS)

The number of words which the eye perceives in advance of their evocation by the voice when a subject is reading aloud.

World’s Christian Fundamentals Association (WCFA)

An organization formed in 1919 by a group of leaders of various fundamentalist Protestant Christian sects to mount a massive, formal education effort to combat secular education in the United States.

Cambridge Platform

An agreement signed in 1648 by the synods of four New England colonies to try to unify the various Protestant reform movements into a single Puritan/Anglican church.

Discrimination index

Any measurement that indicates the extent to which a test item differentiates between those with the ability it is supposed to measure and those without it.

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