A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Metropolitan Achievement Tests

One of the most widely used batteries of standardized tests to measure student achievement in grades K through 12. There are six batteries of tests: Primer, for grades k-1.4; Primary I, for 1.5–2.4; Primary II, for 2.5–3.4; Elementary, for 3.5– 4.9; Intermediate, for 5.0–6.9; Advanced, for 7.0–9.5; and High School, for grades 9–13. The Primer measures reading and writing ability and ability to listen for sounds. The Primary I subtests are “Word Knowledge,” “Word Analysis,” “Reading,” “Mathematics Computation” and “Mathematics Concepts.” As the tests become more advanced, they add such subtests as “Mathematics Problem Solving,” “Science,” “Social Science” and “Spelling.” The high school battery measures achievement in language arts, social studies, mathematics and science. Published by the Psychological Corporation/ Harcourt Brace & Co., the tests last from about an hour to as long as 4½ hours, depending on grade level. Other widely used achievement tests include the California Achievement Test, the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills and the STANFORD ACHIEVEMENT TEST.

Sipuel v. Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma

A 1948 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that the state must provide opportunities for legal education for blacks and must do so for one race as soon as for the other.

Pintner General Ability Tests

A onceubiquitous battery of aptitude tests routinely given each year in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s to measure academic aptitudes of students in all grades, from K through 12.

Teacher centers

Independent, educative organizations that provide teachers with in-service programs, conferences and other professional development opportunities in a nonthreatening environment away from their schools or colleges.

Remediation program

A broad-based instructional program to correct multiple deficiencies in a student’s educational development.

National Labor Relations Board v. Catholic Bishop of Chicago

A 1974 ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court that the National Labor Relations Board lacked the power to intervene ...

Norm

In education, the average achievement or performance level of a preselected group against which others may be compared to determine whether they are above, below or at the norm.

Dalton Plan

A system of individualized instruction in which the student helps design his or her program of study and “signs a contract” pledging to complete the program within a specific time period.

Genius

A vague and often misused “catchall” term referring to any person of exceptional talent or intellectual ability.

“Cafeteria style” curriculum

A term referring to “open” high school curricula offering students a wide choice of electives.

New Light–Old Light controversy

A bitter ecclesiastical dispute among Protestant clergymen in the 18th-century American colonies that led eventually to the creation of large numbers of new educational institutions. The controversy centered around the question of salvation.

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