A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Metropolitan Achievement Tests

One of the most widely used batteries of standardized tests to measure student achievement in grades K through 12. There are six batteries of tests: Primer, for grades k-1.4; Primary I, for 1.5–2.4; Primary II, for 2.5–3.4; Elementary, for 3.5– 4.9; Intermediate, for 5.0–6.9; Advanced, for 7.0–9.5; and High School, for grades 9–13. The Primer measures reading and writing ability and ability to listen for sounds. The Primary I subtests are “Word Knowledge,” “Word Analysis,” “Reading,” “Mathematics Computation” and “Mathematics Concepts.” As the tests become more advanced, they add such subtests as “Mathematics Problem Solving,” “Science,” “Social Science” and “Spelling.” The high school battery measures achievement in language arts, social studies, mathematics and science. Published by the Psychological Corporation/ Harcourt Brace & Co., the tests last from about an hour to as long as 4½ hours, depending on grade level. Other widely used achievement tests include the California Achievement Test, the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills and the STANFORD ACHIEVEMENT TEST.

Word processing

The production and editing of printed documents on a computerized system that includes a keyboard, video display, magnetic storage device and software or operating system.

Board of Cooperative Education Services (BOCES)

An intermediate school organization unit in New York State to provide specialized services on a shared-cost basis to two or more school districts that cannot afford to provide such services on their own.

Perennialism

An educational philosophy that all necessary education can be found in socalled eternal (“perennial”) truths expressed in classical works of literature, philosophy, history, art, science, mathematics, and so on.

Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association (YM–YWHA)

Any of more than 400 local organizations that provide educational cultural, recreational, health, social and other services to about 750,000 people of all ages—non-Jewish as well as Jewish.

American Museum of Natural History

One of four great American museums whose founding after the Civil War marked a new era in the development of museums as public, educative institutions.

Richard Allestree (1619–1681)

Professor of divinity at Christ Church, Oxford University, England, provost of Eton College and author of popular devotional literature which, in the absence of schools in the wilderness of North America, became the essential primers for educating colonial children.

Quincy Grammar School

A Boston school where the modern system of graded schools was introduced in 1848. In an effort to reduce classroom overcrowding and establish order and discipline, the innovative educator John D.

Work study

somewhat confusing term referring to on-campus job programs for needy students to earn part of the costs of tuition and room and board at college or university. 

Lee v. Weisman

A 1992 U.S.

U.S. v. foreign high schools

The constantly shifting comparison of the academic achievement of American and foreign high school students.

Feedback