A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z

Metropolitan Achievement Tests

One of the most widely used batteries of standardized tests to measure student achievement in grades K through 12. There are six batteries of tests: Primer, for grades k-1.4; Primary I, for 1.5–2.4; Primary II, for 2.5–3.4; Elementary, for 3.5– 4.9; Intermediate, for 5.0–6.9; Advanced, for 7.0–9.5; and High School, for grades 9–13. The Primer measures reading and writing ability and ability to listen for sounds. The Primary I subtests are “Word Knowledge,” “Word Analysis,” “Reading,” “Mathematics Computation” and “Mathematics Concepts.” As the tests become more advanced, they add such subtests as “Mathematics Problem Solving,” “Science,” “Social Science” and “Spelling.” The high school battery measures achievement in language arts, social studies, mathematics and science. Published by the Psychological Corporation/ Harcourt Brace & Co., the tests last from about an hour to as long as 4½ hours, depending on grade level. Other widely used achievement tests include the California Achievement Test, the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills and the STANFORD ACHIEVEMENT TEST.

Recreation

In education, any structured or unstructured period of nonacademic activities organized for the relaxation and amusement of students.

Deregulation

In education, the transfer of authority from district and state boards, bureaucracies and political leaders to local school administrators and faculties.

Secondary School Science Project (SSSP)

An earth-science course developed by a group of geologists in the 1960s for high school students.

John I. Goodlad (1921– )

Educator / founder and longtime director of the CENTER FOR EDUCATIONAL RENEWAL, a major force for educational reform in the United States during the last two decades of the 20th century.

Calculator

An electronic device which, depending on its complexity, automatically performs a variety of mathematical operations.

George Bancroft (1800–1891)

American educator, historian and statesman who, as secretary of navy under President James Knox Polk, presided over the founding of the UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY, at Annapolis, Maryland, in 1845.

“A Nation Prepared: Teachers for the 21st Century”

A report issued in 1986 by the Task Force on Teaching of the Carnegie Forum on Education and the Economy.

Battered-child syndrome

A range of injuries symptomatic of physical abuse by a parent or surrogate, including fractures, hematomas (black-and-blue marks), skin tears and injuries, poor hygiene or evident malnutrition.

Oklahoma

The 46th state admitted to the Union, in 1907.

Peabody Education Fund

A philanthropic trust established in 1867 by Massachusetts financier and railroad magnate GEORGE FOSTER PEABODY to build schools and promote education in the south.

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